The School Games is a unique opportunity to motivate and inspire millions of young people across the country to take part in more competitive school sport.

The Games are made up of four levels of activity: competition in schools, between schools, at county/area level and a national finals event:

  • Level 1 - sporting competition for all students in school through intra-school competition
  • Level 2 - individuals and teams are selected to represent their schools in local inter-school competitions
  • Level 3 – the county/area will stage multi-sport School Games festivals as a culmination of year-round school sport competition
  • Level 4 – the School Games finals: a national multi-sport event where the most talented young people in the UK will be selected to compete in our sporting venues 

The Games are designed to build on the magic of 2012 to enable every school and child to participate in competitive sport, including meaningful opportunities for disabled youngsters.

Nationally and locally the School Games is being delivered through partnerships. 

The national partnership is made up of:

  • the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS), which has overall policy leadership, supported by the Department for Education (DofE) and the Department of Health (DOH); 
  • Sport England, which is the Lottery distributor and are supporting the engagement of Sports Governing Bodies and County Sports Partnerships; 
  • the Youth Sport Trust, the landscape lead organisation for school sport, which has been commissioned by Sport England to provide development support to schools, sports and other local partners.

Over £128m of Lottery and Government funding is being invested to support the School Games. This includes: up to £35.5m Lottery funding from Sport England between 2010-15; £28.4m exchequer funding from the Department of Health and Sport England to fund 450 School Games Organisers (SGOs) and Change 4 Life Clubs; £65m exchequer funding from the DOE to release a PE teacher for one day a week in all secondary schools.

At a local level, the School Games will be delivered by schools, clubs, county sports partnerships and other local partners. Local Organising Committees (LOCs) are being set up, chaired by Head Teachers, to oversee the county festivals. County sports partnerships have an important role to play in helping to stage the festivals.

Why get involved in the School Games?

  • Provide more opportunities for those currently not engaged in competitive sport and help all young people achieve their potential
  • Provide access to a range of competition formats to offer new and exciting options to young people
  • Maximise the impact of competitive school sport to develop young people's personal skills
  • Offer opportunities for young people to develop leadership skills through volunteer roles such as officials and team managers
  • Complement other initiatives in the school which encourage a wide range of young people to participate in sport, such as Change4Life sports clubs
  • Through four levels of competitive sport, young people have the opportunity to get involved, have fun and challenge themselves.

What is the School Games Mark?

The School Games Mark is a Government led awards scheme launched in 2012 to reward schools for their commitment to the development of competition across their school and into the community. Schools in England are able to assess themselves across bronze, silver and gold levels.

The Mark is a retrospective award which will validate your success over the ongoing academic year. Therefore, it's important to familiarise yourself with the criteria documents made available in January each year.

Why should our school apply?

  • OfSTED can use the Mark award as part of their inspection framework
  • You can proudly display your collateral at your school
  • You can use it as a development tool to aid the PE teacher or Headteacher as your school
  • You can add the logo to letterheads and email signatures to show your outstanding commitment to school sport.